Author Topic: Where Are The Cuts: Monitoring The Big Society, well by Society I suppose?  (Read 1687 times)

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Offline Steve Wakefield

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This is a an interesting idea, its gives an overview of what is happening and where. Who will be the first to put Swindon on the Map?

http://wherearethecuts.org/
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Offline Alex

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We're on there- lumped in with Oxfordhsire and Hampshire- all "Arts" cuts.

 Theatre and Dance suffering cuts so far in Swindon:
 http://wherearethecuts.org/reports/index/?c=0&sw=-1.78,50.7&ne=-0.8,51.76

Offline Muggins

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Are we going to be Ok after all?

Government promises £470m for sector capacity-building
The government plans to spend £470m over the next four years building the capacity of the voluntary sector to deliver the Big Society, it announced in the Comprehensive Spending Review today.

Within this allocation will be a one-year, £100m transition fund to help voluntary sector groups adjust to new public spending budgets.

Chancellor George Osborne said the £2.6bn Cabinet Office budget would be reduced by £55m by 2014/15 but there would be additional money to support the Big Society by building the capacity of the sector and funding new community organisers.  Funds will also be made available to pilot the National Citizen Service and set up a Community First Fund to support local and community organisations.

The CSR report stated: “The reforms underpinning the Spending Review represent a significant increase in the opportunities and funding available to the voluntary and community sector in the medium and longer-term.

“As well as new opportunities and rights, the government will assist new providers by improving access to the resources they need. 

“The government will direct around £470m over the Spending Review period to support capacity building in the voluntary and community sector, including an endowment fund to assist local voluntary and community organisations. As part of this, the government will provide funds to pilot the National Citizen Service and establish a transition fund of £100m to provide short-term support for voluntary sector organisations providing public services.”

The Review also stated that the government would pay and tender for more services by results rather than be the default provider, and would look to set proportions of specific services that should be delivered by independent providers, including voluntary sector groups.

“This approach will be explored in adult social care, early years, community health services, pathology services, youth services, court and tribunal services, and early interventions for the neediest families,” the report said.

It also confirmed that the Big Society Bank would receive all dormant accounts cash, and that government would “work with the financial sector, the voluntary sector and community groups to develop innovative equity investment opportunities in public services”.

Museums and other cultural institutions will be permitted more flexible use of money they raise independently and will be able to establish trust arrangements that enable them to generate more funding from private sources. Further details of the government review of ways to increase philanthropic giving will be announced later this year.

The government promised that to maintain the momentum for reform, and consult further with public sector staff, citizens and communities on how to deliver better services, it would publish a reform White Paper early in the New Year, setting out further detail on these policies.

Overall, the Chancellor said that cuts to departmental budgets averaged 19 per cent, which was less severe than the 25 per cent expected and down to bigger savings from the welfare budget.
Local authorities will see their budgets cut by 7.1 per cent each year for the next four years. Both the NHS and the schools budget will increase and there is an extra £2bn allocated to social care over the four-year period.

Up to 500,000 public sector jobs could be lost by 2014-15 as the result of the cuts, according to the Office for Budget Responsibility.

Osborne has not set out in detail where the jobs will go but he admitted there will be some redundancies in the public sector, which he said were unavoidable when the country had run out of money.







Lifes not always fair. Sometimes you can get a splinter even sliding down a rainbow. - Cherralea Morgen

Offline Geoff Reid

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Are we going to be Ok after all?

No.

It will take a month or so for someone clever to work out how and where the figures have been shuffled.

Bend over, you know it's coming.....

Offline Muggins

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Buying all I need/want now in advnace of the 2.5% increas in VAT!
Lifes not always fair. Sometimes you can get a splinter even sliding down a rainbow. - Cherralea Morgen

Offline chrisp

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I liked the fact that the cuts are less than Labour said they were going to do. The mirror said is 19% v 20%

Offline Muggins

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Ah, but it's where the cuts are made, chrisp.
Lifes not always fair. Sometimes you can get a splinter even sliding down a rainbow. - Cherralea Morgen

Offline Steve Wakefield

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"Britain’s borrowing costs have dropped to the lowest in a generation, falling below those of Germany, Europe’s biggest and strongest economy, reflecting in part investor confidence that the government can bring the deficit under control. George Osborne, the chancellor, vowed on Thursday that he would not retreat on his plans to rein in the deficit, the most ambitious effort to cut public spending announced by any major economy." From the FT  October 21st 2010

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Offline moley

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I liked the fact that the cuts are less than Labour said they were going to do. The mirror said is 19% v 20%

the problem with that (and where the economics get complicated (this from a Jeremy Warner article in the Telegraph, not exactly a bastion of left-wing propaganda)) is that the cuts to department budgets were lower than touted, but in addition there were greater welfare cuts than labour would probably have done.    In economic terms, a welfare cut has a similar effect to a tax rise - because people end up with less money in their pockets to actually spend on stuff.

So whilst Osborne may have kept to the letter of his promise on revenue raised from spending cuts vs tax rises, in economic terms he's taken as much money out of the economy (with knock-on effects) as if he'd actually increased taxes by more than he said.

Moley

 

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