Author Topic: Tony illegally leaving a big steaming pile of  (Read 952 times)

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Offline Krippers

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Tony illegally leaving a big steaming pile of
« on: May 10, 2007, 08:25:55 pm »
unworkable, pointless, pile of tripe that is the ID card.

They tried to illegally bury the new revised cost of the ID card (£640 million up on last time) in Blairs announcement to leave. Not buried  though, spread the word http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/politics/article2528508.ece
In a world bereft of hope, lost to immeasurable inhumanity,   entrenched in commercial exploitation, devoid of hope, where's my underpants?

Offline Krippers

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Now I am scared
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2007, 08:30:03 am »
This is as insidious as it gets to be honest, it means the the government are determined to push this through irrespective of who holds high office. Given the manner of this release, that is to say illegally, it is clear that Labour under any guise is an organisation hell bent on pushing through this legislation by the use of subterfuge and spin. Now beyond all times in the history of Blair am I truly scared, the true colours of these petty little autocrats that represent not one jot of the idealism that they once held shine through. Now more than ever I find I am committed with everything I am and can be to fight this, to deny their vision of my rights, deny their arrogant assumption that they can do this. The means by which they released this information make it clear that they know how weak the policy is, how unacceptable it is to everyone except those that want control over us, and that they are prepared to use any means to get it in place.

In a world bereft of hope, lost to immeasurable inhumanity,   entrenched in commercial exploitation, devoid of hope, where's my underpants?

Offline Geoff Reid

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Re: Tony illegally leaving a big steaming pile of
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2007, 09:48:02 am »
I'm glad you're angry Krippers.....  :)

.....and I hope what I am about to post will increase the level of your anger to the level of incandescence.

Firstly, this relevent quote from another place.

Quote
Meantime, you will note in yesterdays Dobson report that they've split the costs and are attributing some to "foreign
nationals" both in an attempt to pretend they aren't really part of the scheme, and to wave the race card in peripheral vision. Foreign
nationals includes all non-EU residents so that's the cost of fingerprinting and tracking everyone who is here legitimately, from
your Indian auntie on a long visit, and the overseas students paying fat fees to keep the local university open, to Madonna and Kylie
Minogue. Nothing to do with illegal immigration at all - that's undocumented.

Secondly, a couple of days ago I received an invitation from Intertech to attend the 'Advanced Identification Systems EU exhibition in Brussels next week.

Six days notice wasn't sufficient to reorganise my schedule to be able either make it or free up enough cash to find the $1,495 conference fee, plus hotels, travel and grub.

Otherwise I would be there, rubbing shoulders with the likes of Accenture, the UK Home Office and Immigration Service, and generally finding out what our Government is falling over itself to spend our money on.....

Here's some low-quality piccies of the brochure/invitation.

This is a good quality pdf of the brochure.  http://www.talkswindon.org/no2id/events/Intertech-AISEU-2007.pdf

It is well worth downloading the pdf and reading the brochure in its full glory.....

Under the '10 reasons to attend' the U.K governments a couple of the most attractive reasons for wanting this scheme so badly are proudly presented...

  • Identify Commercial Growth Areas
  • Identify Lucrative Government Opportunities


Galileo are also attending......and that in itself should point a robustly inquisitive finger at the possibility of tracking individuals by satellite. WHy else would they be at an identity conference?.

























This government is still prepared to use the 9/11 method of burying bad news.

Blair may soon be history but the song will remain the same.




 

shorty

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Re: Is your banking being watched ?
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2007, 01:16:25 pm »
from http://www.theregister.com

Bank customers wanting to make international transactions are being asked to sign a waiver to allow their personal details and financial records to be scanned by US anti-terror investigators.

The waivers put customers in the same Catch-22 European data protection officials found themselves in after it emerged that the US had been snooping on the world's international financial transactions in the hope of picking up some transnational insurgents.

According to reports received by The Register, people wanting to make international money transfers using the Belgian-based international banking co-operative Swift (as most do), have been asked to sign a form giving their approval for details of their transaction to be disclosed "to any Government entity, regulatory authority or to any person we reasonably think necessary for these purposes".

These purposes being "fighting crime and terrorism" and "any applicable laws".

The disclaimer warns: "This may mean that personal information will be transferred outside the EEA to countries, which do not provide the same level of data protection as the UK."

This is illegal under EU law, which says data should not be sent to countries that don't give people the same data protection rights.

Yet if customers don't sign away their privacy rights to foreign governments in the name of the "war on terror", they will find it very difficult to make international payments.

This was the same dilemma faced by the EU data protection authorities when they investigated the Swift situation earlier this year. The US was going to take Swift's records no matter what the EU authorities thought about their comparatively inferior data protection laws. And as there was no alternative to Swift, the only solution was for Swift to pull its US servers back onto European soil.

The US and EU are presently trying to harmonise their data protection laws to make such waivers unnecessary. EU law requires police to have good reason for going into people's private records. But proposals are being passed that might water these protections down. ®


Offline Krippers

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Re: Tony illegally leaving a big steaming pile of
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2007, 01:24:40 pm »
Fascinating read Geoff, I pulled the document from the link. There is some inclusion in the programme of social impact and requirements for privacy but of course it constitutes about 5% of the total content.

I found the 9:15 brief to be interesting which holds the line:
it's not the technology, it's the application.

Although out of context it is still somewhat of an apt line of text.
In a world bereft of hope, lost to immeasurable inhumanity,   entrenched in commercial exploitation, devoid of hope, where's my underpants?

 

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